1959 books matched your search criteria. 20 books have been returned starting at 61.
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Imprint: London, Roadway Timetables, Bookings & Publications Ltd,, [1932]
1010 x 1265 mm., colour printed lithographic map with blue edged border all the way around, with original folds in very good condition.
An unusual Quad-Royal poster of the London Underground in that it is laid onto a map of Central London at the scale of just under 7 inches to the mile. A note in the upper margin states 'Southgate extension of the Piccadilly Railway from Finsbury Park is now under construction ...', this helps in dating it as the Southgate station opened on 13 March 1933. In 1933 the iconic Underground design by Harry Beck was first published. In this the lines of the Underground are colour coded and do not detract from the street plan itself. Red circles denote the stations which are reminiscent of the earlier design introduced in 1908. Stingemore style lines are shown in different colours.It extends from Willesden Green top left, Drayton Park and Holloway Road top right, Oval lower right, Hammersmith and Walham Green lower left and London Bridge and the Oval stations lower right. The imprints in the lower margin read from left to right 'Drawn by G.W. Bacon & Co., Ltd.', centre 'Copyright map by Roadway Timetables, Bookings & Publications Ltd, Roadway Corner, Warwick Street, London W.1.', and to the right 'Litho - J.Weiner Ltd, London W.C.1.' David Leboff and Tim Demuth, 'No need to ask! : Early maps of London's Underground Railways', p. 76 has a full page illustration of this map (lacking the blue border), with details on the opposite page.
Stock number:9018.
£ 2950.00 ( approx. $US 3839.13 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[c.46]
Octavo (170 x 105 mm.), full modern blind panelled mottled calf. With raised bands, ornate blind decoration to compartments, red calf gilt titled label to spine. Engraved double page title with minor crease, engraved double page dedication and 53 double page plates numbered 1-50 which include 7 tables, 6 general and 40 county maps. Engraved throughout and in fine CONTEMPORARY FULL WASH COLOUR. Some centrefold restoration to the chart of England and Wales, some loss to margin of Cornwall reinstated, Lancashire and Lincolnshire restored and some minor centrefold splits repaired, otherwise a reasonable example in a rare form.
This is an example of the 'Chorographia Britannia' in full early wash colour. First published in 1742 this is a later edition bearing the revised imprint of John Clark on the title page. He had joined Charles Hitch and William Henry Toms in the ownership of the atlas by November 1745 when a newly worded advert was placed in the 'Evening Post'. Clark died in April 1746 and was succeeded by his wife Anne. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising it took so long for one to be published considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. Two similar atlases were to be published shortly after, the 'Geographia Magnae Britanniae' by Thomas Osborne, 1748, and the 'Small English Atlas' by Thomas Kitchin and Thomas Jefferys, 1749. Chubb 173; Hodson I no. 192; Shirley BL T.Bad 1d.
Stock number:5060.
£ 1500.00 ( approx. $US 1952.10 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[45]
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Octavo (165 x 110 mm.), modern half calf, red cloth boards, raised bands to the spine blind ruled, with gilt calf title label. Lacking engraved title. Dedication, 5 tables, 4 general and 42 county maps and 2 plates of rates for Hackney carriages etc. engraved throughout. Some titles trimmed at the top. Some minor centrefold splitting, last couple of leaves a little brittle at the edges with some loss, some light foxing, otherwise in acceptable condition.
Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-1745) was a surveyor and engineer who was involved in many schemes to improve the waterways. He was also an established author and in 1742 he had William Henry Toms engrave a series of maps from his draughts and publish them as the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising that it took so long considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. This is the first edition to introduce two plates number 49 and 50 of the Hackney coaches. Provenance: ownership inscription of G. Francis dated Oct 31st 1859, private collection of Rodney Shirley. Beresiner (1983) pp. 49-50; ESTC T153842; Hodson (1984-97) no. 191; Shirley (2004) T.Bad 1c; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7212.
£ 750.00 ( approx. $US 976.05 )
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Imprint: London, 1742-[c.46]
Binding: Hardback
Octavo (170 x 110 mm.), full contemporary calf, gilt panelled boards, rebacked preserving original label with ribbed spine ruled with gilt. Engraved double page title, engraved double page dedication and 53 double page plates numbered 1-50 which include 7 tables, 6 general and 40 county maps. Engraved throughout and in full contemporary wash colour. Lower centrefold split to Shropshire, otherwise in good condition.
This is a lovely example of the 'Chorographia Britannia' in full early wash colour. First published in 1742 this is a later edition bearing the revised imprint of John Clark on the title page. He had joined Charles Hitch and William Henry Toms in the ownership of the atlas by November 1745, when a newly worded advert was placed in the 'Evening Post'. Clark died in April 1746 and was succeeded by his wife Anne. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising it took so long for one to be published considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. Provenance: G. F. Smith on inside front cover; private English collection. Chubb (1927) 173; Hodson (1984-97) no. 192; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:7300.
£ 1950.00 ( approx. $US 2537.73 )
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Imprint: London, 1742
Edition: First Edition
Octavo (160 x 100 mm.), full recent calf, ribbed spine with gilt date and green calf gilt title label. With engraved title, Dedication, 5 tables, 4 general and 42 county maps, engraved throughout. Dedication with small tear repaired upper edge, some cleaning and regarding, otherwise in acceptable condition.
Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-1745) was a surveyor and engineer who was involved in many schemes to improve the waterways. He was also an established author and in 1742 he had William Henry Toms engrave a series of maps from his draughts and publish them as the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. It is the first pocket size English county atlas published in the eighteenth century. It is surprising that it took so long considering the runaway success of the 'Britannia Depicta' of 1720. The first edition of the atlas is found in four variants and was on sale for only a short period of time. Within two or three months a new edition was published.The second issue placed plate numbers '8' and '9' on the two where it was omitted. This example is one of only three identified of the extremely rare third issue of the first edition of the 'Chorographia Britanniae'. Following the immediate addition of plate numbers to those of Cambridgeshire and Cheshire which had been omitted on publication Toms ordered the addition of the price to the end of the imprint on the title page. Even though all evidence shows the price of the atlas was 6 shillings from the start ‘Price Bound 5s’ was added. The error was picked up immediately and corrected for the fourth and last variant of the first edition. Hodson could only find one example of this rare issue, that in the Royal Geographical Society (Ford 146). One other in a private collection is known to me and then this third example was uncovered. In the two privately held ones the price has been inked over to show 6s. Provenance: private English collection. Beresiner (1983) pp. 49-50; Chubb (1927) 170; ESTC T165385; Hodson (1984-97) no. 188 (atlas C p. 164); refer Shirley (2004) T.Bad 1a; Worms & Baynton-Williams (2011).
Stock number:9211.
£ 950.00 ( approx. $US 1236.33 )
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Imprint: London, 1741
14.5 x 15 cm. Early wash colour
ex 'Chorographia Britanniae'. Thomas Badeslade (fl.1719-45) was an engineer and surveyor. Thomas was also an author and draughtsman who drew maps of the Fens as part of his work of waterway improvements. His only atlas is the 'Chorographia Britanniae' issued in 1742 published by W H Toms who engraved the maps. There were later editions to c.1749. Skelton-Hodson 188.
Stock number:2567.
£ 55.00 ( approx. $US 71.58 )
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Imprint: Liverpool, 1824-5
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (280 x 205 mm.), contemporary half calf, paper boards bearing original ornate title, gilt ruled and titled spine. With 12 maps of which 4 are folding and 8 town plans, plus 2 folding tables. Light wear but otherwise in good condition.
This collection contains a fine large folding map of the county by W. Wales with attractive vignette of Liverpool. A similar sized plan of Liverpool by Neele & Son. The two tables of the distances of the principal towns of England and the 'Population Returns of England' drawn from the 1821 census. Single sheet town plans of Preston, Lancaster, Ashton under Lime, Stockport, Bolton, Blackburn, Rochdale and Oldham, a large folding of Manchester, general map of England and Wales. Provenance: Bow Windows Bookshop.
Stock number:7293.
£ 320.00 ( approx. $US 416.45 )
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Imprint: London, c.1790
180 x 265 mm., in good condition.
This fine copper plate engraving of the city of Dublin is from Thomas Bankes' 'New and Complete System of Geography'.
Stock number:7636.
£ 50.00 ( approx. $US 65.07 )
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Imprint: London, George Virtue, c.1842
Binding: Hardback
Quarto (285 x 230 mm.), contemporary half calf, cloth boards, blind ruled, gilt raised bands, blind ruled, with gilt title, light wear. With 50 engraved maps and 11 plates. Some water staining to first three leaves, some fox marks, the maps with unusually decent margins.
First issue of the ‘Enlarged, improved and adapted’ B. B. Woodward edition with plans of both Oxford and Cambridge. Thomas Moule (1784-1851) was a noted historian, map seller and publisher. His finest work is the ‘English Counties Delineated’ first published in 1837 following its issue in parts from May 1830 to the spring of 1836. The maps are considered the most attractive of all the later English county atlases. They are all highly decorative and bear a series of vignettes. The publisher was George Virtue & Co. who used the same beautiful plates in his publication of the Rev. James Barclay’s ‘Complete and Universal English Dictionary’ c.1842. A new title page was engraved soon after entitled Barclay’s ‘Universal English Dictionary’ as offered here. The early issues were ‘Newly Revised by Henry W. Dewhurst, Esq: F.E.S.L.’ Soon after they were revised by B. B. Woodward as here. Provenance: Thomas Powell of Birmingham dated June 8th 1878. Beresiner (1983) pp. 160-3; Not in Chubb.
Stock number:6326.
£ 795.00 ( approx. $US 1034.61 )
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Imprint: London, 1797
680 x 490 mm., in good condition.
Sir John Barrow (1764-1848) was an English explorer and the Private Secretary to Lord Macartney whilst he was Ambassador to China. He would later become a founder member and vice-president to the Royal Geographical Society. The official account of Lord Macartney's voyage to the Qianlong Emperor of China 1792-94 was published as Sir George Staunton's 'An Authentic Account of an Embassy from the King of Great Britain to the Emperor of China'. Staunton (1737-1801) was a diplomat accompanying the voyage. This large chart displays the route from Canton to Nanjin (Nankin). Cordier Sinica 2381-3; Tooley's Dictionary.
Stock number:6291.
£ 250.00 ( approx. $US 325.35 )
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Imprint: London, 1950
Binding: Hardback
560 x 820 mm., printed colour, large folding map backed on linen within its publishers end boards complete with printed title, in very good condition.
John Bartholomew (1805-61) was the first of the family name to join a business founded in 1784. The period of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries represented the height of the companies influence. The main influence of growth in the business was John George Bartholomew (1831-93). He was the inventor of layer colouring, first introduced in his maps in 1888. One of the firms first significant productions was the ‘Imperial Map of England and Wales’ derived from the Ordnance Survey. The map is a typically detailed one engraved on steel. It is drawn on a scale of half an inch to the mile. Beresiner ‘British County Maps’ pp. 52-3.
Stock number:8095.
£ 95.00 ( approx. $US 123.63 )
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Imprint: London, 1751
360 x 470 mm., with some very light toning otherwise in good condition.
A beautifully engraved plan of the town of Ghent which was taken twice in 1706 and 1708 here engraved by Isaac Basire. A small assumption is made in naming the engraver Isaac as the initial could be read as a 'J' for his son James who was not born until 1730. An explanation upper right identifies 81 key points of the map. From Nicolas Tindal's 'Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England'. Shirley, R.W. (BL Atlases) G.RAP 1a, no. 27.
Stock number:4666.
£ 130.00 ( approx. $US 169.18 )
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Imprint: London, 1747
360 x 480 mm., in good condition.
Plan of the siege of Turin by Prince Eugene on Sept. 7, 1706 here engraved by Isaac Basire. A small assumption is made in naming the engraver Isaac as the initial could be read as a 'J' for his son James who was not born until 1730. An explanation upper left identifies the key points of the map. From Nicolas Tindal's 'Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England'. Shirley, R.W. (BL Atlases) G.RAP 1a, no. 16.
Stock number:4645.
£ 220.00 ( approx. $US 286.31 )
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Imprint: London, 1751
390 x 600 mm., full wash colour, with a double fold as issued in the book. In good condition.
A beautifully engraved bird's-eye view of the Rock of Gibraltar by Isaac Basire. An explanation lower left identifies the key points. From Nicolas Tindal's 'Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England'. Shirley, R.W. (BL Atlases) G.RAP-1a, no. 7.
Stock number:8172.
£ 275.00 ( approx. $US 357.88 )
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Imprint: London, 1747
360 x 480 mm. With a double fold as issued in the book. A fine example.
A beautifully engraved bird's-eye panoramic view of the town of Casal by Isaac Basire. It is depicted flanking the River Po. From Nicolas Tindal's 'Continuation of Mr. Rapin's History of England'. Shirley, R.W. (BL Atlases) G.RAP-1a, no. 17.
Stock number:4646.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 253.77 )
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Imprint: Paris, c.1760
280 x 420 mm., in early wash colour, light dirt to some of the margins otherwise in good condition.
This copperplate engraving is a fine example of the school of prints known loosely as 'Vue d'Optique'. They are most easily recognised by there consistent dimensions and style with notable blue wash skies. They are a form of perspective view which were popular during the eighteenth century in Europe. They were designed to be viewed through an optical device known as a 'zograscope' or 'optique', and were issued by many different publishers in various cities. This one is by Paul-Andre Basset who is part of an extensive family of print publishers in Paris. It is a fine bird's-eye view of the Piazza di San Giovanni in Laterano in Rome and is much the same today as it is in the view.
Stock number:7384.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 162.67 )
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Imprint: Paris, 4 May 1766
280 x 415 mm., early wash colour, with large deckled edge margins, in good condition.
This copperplate engraving is a fine example of the school of prints known loosely as 'Vue d'Optique'. They are most easily recognised by there consistent dimensions and style with notable blue wash skies. They are a form of perspective view which were popular during the eighteenth century in Europe. They were designed to be viewed through an optical device known as a 'zograscope' or 'optique', and were issued by many different publishers in various cities. This one is by Paul-Andre Basset who is part of an extensive family of print publishers in Paris. It is a fine bird's-eye view of the Foundling Hospital in London founded in 1741 by Thomas Coram. He was a philanthropic sea captain who set up the home as a place for children to be educated and housed who had been abandoned or deserted. The word hospital was used more openly in those days to refer to hospitality rather than today's meaning of more medical needs.
Stock number:7382.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 162.67 )
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Imprint: Paris, c.1760
280 x 405 mm., in early wash colour, light mark to the lower right corner of the margin, otherwise in good condition.
This copperplate engraving is a fine example of the school of prints known loosely as 'Vue d'Optique'. They are most easily recognised by there consistent dimensions and style with notable blue wash skies. They are a form of perspective view which were popular during the eighteenth century in Europe. They were designed to be viewed through an optical device known as a 'zograscope' or 'optique', and were issued by many different publishers in various cities. This one is by Paul-Andre Basset who is part of an extensive family of print publishers in Paris. It is a fine view of the approach to the royal palace of Versailles.
Stock number:8897.
£ 125.00 ( approx. $US 162.67 )
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Imprint: Paris, c.1760
235 x 415 mm., early wash colour, now binding marks, some minor edge tears in the very large margins, otherwise in good condition.
This copperplate engraving is a fine example of the school of prints known loosely as 'Vue d'Optique'. They are most easily recognised by there consistent dimensions and style with notable blue wash skies. They are a form of perspective view which were popular during the eighteenth century in Europe. They were designed to be viewed through an optical device known as a 'zograscope' or 'optique', and were issued by many different publishers in various cities. This one is by Paul-Andre Basset who is part of an extensive family of print publishers in Paris. It is a fine bird's-eye view of Covent Garden flower market. It began in a small manner in 1649 but following the Great Fire of London in 1666 which destroyed the markets in the City grew considerably. By the 1760s the market occupied much of the square.
Stock number:7381.
£ 195.00 ( approx. $US 253.77 )
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Imprint: London & Aylesbury, Watson & Hazell, 1870
Edition: First Edition
Binding: Hardback
Duodecimo (185 x 130 mm.), original publishers brown cloth, ornate gilt panelling, gilt titles to the front board and the spine. pp. vii, 127, with 8 plates from photographs. In good condition.
First edition, published to mark the opening of a new town hall. An early photographic book of the town and surroundings of Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire. The photographs are the work of H. V. Lemenager or Bushey.
Stock number:7378.
£ 95.00 ( approx. $US 123.63 )
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